Vaccination


The WHO recommends influenza vaccination for the following high risk groups

  • Pregnant women (highest priority)
  • Children aged 6 to 59 months
  • Elderly
  • Individuals with specific chronic medical conditions
  • Healthcare workers

Prevention of influenza

For the upcoming flu season, flu vaccination will be very important to reduce flu because it can help reduce the overall impact of respiratory illnesses on the population and thus lessen the resulting burden on the healthcare system during the COVID-19 pandemic.1

A flu vaccine may also provide several individual health benefits, including keeping you from getting sick with flu, reducing the severity of your illness if you do get flu and reducing your risk of a flu-associated hospitalization.

    Flu infections begin to rise as we enter the second month of flu season _ News _ tulsaworld.com

Prevention and Control of Seasonal Influenza with Vaccines: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)—United States, 2020-21

  • Persons who are immunocompromised due to any cause, including (but not limited to) medications or HIV infection
  • Women who are or will be pregnant during the influenza season
  • Children and adolescents (aged 6 months through 18 years) receiving aspirin- or salicylate-containing medications who might be at risk for Reye syndrome associated with influenza
  • Residents of nursing homes and long-term care facilities
  • American Indians/Alaska Natives
  • Persons who are extremely obese (BMI ≥40 for adults)
  • Caregivers and contacts of those at risk:
    • Health care personnel, including all paid and unpaid persons working in health-care settings who have potential for exposure to patients and/or to infectious materials, whether or not directly involved in patient care;
    • Household contacts and caregivers of children aged ≤59 months (i.e., <5 years), particularly contacts of children aged <6 months, and adults aged ≥50 years;
    • Household contacts and caregivers of persons with medical conditions associated with increased risk of severe complications from influenza

    CDC, Prevention and Control of Seasonal Influenza with Vaccines: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) —United States, 2020-21’, available at, https://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/acip/summary/summary-recommendations.htm, Page last reviewed: August 20, 2020 Content source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), accessed on 8th NOV 2020.

Inactivated Influenza Vaccines may be administered concurrently or sequentially with other inactivated or live vaccines.

Injectable vaccines given simultaneously should be administered at separate anatomic sites.





Recommended composition of influenza virus vaccines for use in the 2020 - 2021 northern hemisphere influenza season (28 February 2020)

 

Quadrivalent vaccines

 

  • A/Guangdong-Maonan/SWL1536/2019 (H1N1)pdm09-like virus;
  • A/Hong Kong/2671/2019 (H3N2)-like virus;
  • B/Washington/02/2019 (B/Victoria lineage)-like virus; and
  • B/Phuket/3073/2013 (B/Yamagata lineage)-like virus.

 

Trivalent influenza vaccines

 

  • A/Guangdong-Maonan/SWL1536/2019 (H1N1)pdm09-like virus;
  • A/Hong Kong/2671/2019 (H3N2)-like virus; and
  • B/Washington/02/2019 (B/Victoria lineage)-like virus.

MAT-BH-2000346-V1-Feb2021